Aviation - INTRODUCTION
EARLY HISTORY
THE 19TH CENTURY
KITTY HAWK AND AFTER
HISTORIC HEADLINES
WORLD WAR I AND AFTER
WORLD WAR II
AFTER WORLD WAR II
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
Airplane
HOW AN AIRPLANE FLIES
SUPERSONIC FLIGHT
AIRPLANE STRUCTURE
Wings
Tail Assembly
Landing Gear
Control Components
Instruments
PROPULSION
TYPES OF AIRPLANES
Land Planes
Carrier-Based Aircraft
Seaplanes
Amphibians
Vertical Takeoff and Landing Airplanes
Short Takeoff and Landing Airplanes
Space Shuttle
CLASSES OF AIRPLANES
Commercial Airplanes
Military Airplanes
General-Aviation Aircraft
HISTORY
The First Airplane Flight
Early Military and Public Interest
Planes of World War I
Development of Commercial Aviation
Aircraft Developments of World War II
The Jumbo Jet Era

Airplane




Anglo-French Concorde | 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747 | Aviation Show | Air Travel | U.S. Air Force

Airplane, engine-driven vehicle that can fly through the air supported by the action of air against its wings. Airplanes are heavier than air, in contrast to vehicles such as balloons and airships, which are lighter than air. Airplanes also differ from other heavier-than-air craft, such as helicopters, because they have rigid wings; control surfaces, movable parts of the wings and tail, which make it possible to guide their flight; and power plants, or special engines that permit level or climbing flight.

Airplanes Airplanes range in size from the single-seat, single-engine private plane to massive jumbo jets capable of carrying hundreds of passengers. A versatile and relatively fast means of transportation, many models of the airplane have been designed for a diverse set of purposes. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Pontoons allow

Pontoons allow this bush plane to land on Lake Abitibbi in Ontario, Canada. Seaplanes have a variety of uses, but they are particularly valuable to bush pilots who must frequently make landings in rugged, limited-access areas.

Pontooned Bush Plane Pontoons allow this bush plane to land on Lake Abitibbi in Ontario, Canada. Seaplanes have a variety of uses, but they are particularly valuable to bush pilots who must frequently make landings in rugged, limited-access areas. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

STOL Plane A

STOL Plane A short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) plane departs from a city airport. These planes need less than 150 m (500 ft) to take off and land. They are useful for landing on small rural runways or short commuter runways. Another special airplane, the VTOL, takes off and lands vertically and is useful for landing on small military ships. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Crop Dusters

Crop Dusters Crop dusters release their payloads on an Arizona lettuce field. Light, responsive planes allow pilots to maneuver only a few feet above the field’s surface. Although this technique allows farmers to treat large crops in a relatively short time, much of the pesticide may be lost in the wind. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Ultralight Plane - aviation show in Israel

Ultralight Plane An ultralight plane flies at an aviation show in Israel. Used for recreation, ultralight planes typically have one small engine and one seat, carry less than 20 liters (5 gal) of fuel, and weigh about 115 kg (250 lb).

747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747

747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, commonly called a jumbo jet, makes a cargo-transport flight. The 747, the first of the wide-bodied commercial jets, had its inaugural flight in 1970. Four jet engines propel the plane, which reaches cruising speeds of 885 km/hr (550 mph).

U.S. Air Force - F-14 Tomcat

F-14 Fighter The swing-wing F-14 Tomcat is the United States Navy’s first-line fighter aircraft. Similar to the U.S. Air Force’s F-15 Eagle, the F-14 is designed for carrier landings. It has a top speed of over 2400 km/h (1500 mph, or Mach 2.34) and a combat radius of 1600 km (1000 mi). (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Anglo-French Concorde

Distinguished by a pointed nose that angles downward during takeoff, the Anglo-French Concorde flew at more than twice the speed of sound. The delta-winged plane was codeveloped by Britain and France and began passenger service in 1976. A plane crash in 2000 that killed 113 people led to the grounding of the airplane. In 2003 both British Airways and Air France decided to discontinue passenger service. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Concorde Airplane Distinguished by a pointed nose that angles downward during takeoff, the Anglo-French Concorde flies at more than twice the speed of sound. The delta-winged plane was co-developed by Britain and France and began passenger service in 1976. Controversy has surrounded its use in the United States; the supersonic plane is very noisy, and some believe its sonic booms harm the environment. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Airplane - Aviation Show

Blue Angels Teams such as the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels perform breathtaking maneuvers with aerobatic planes. Great precision and concentration are required to fly the jets so close together at such high speeds; only well-trained pilots attempt it, and accidents still occur. Here, the Blue Angels fly four across in a tight formation. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Modern airplanes range from ultralight aircraft weighing no more than 46 kg (100 lb) and meant to carry a single pilot, to great jumbo jets, capable of carrying several hundred people, several hundred tons of cargo, and weighing nearly 454 metric tons. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)

Airplanes are adapted to specialized uses. Today there are land planes (aircraft that take off from and land on the ground), seaplanes (aircraft that take off from and land on water), amphibians (aircraft that can operate on both land and sea), and airplanes that can leave the ground using the jet thrust of their engines or rotors (rotating wings) and then switch to wing-borne flight. (Airplane, Anglo-French Concorde, 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747, Aviation Show, Air Travel, U.S. Air Force)



Airplane | Anglo-French Concorde | 747 Jumbo Jet This Boeing 747 | Aviation Show | Air Travel | U.S. Air Force