Aviation - INTRODUCTION
EARLY HISTORY
THE 19TH CENTURY
KITTY HAWK AND AFTER
HISTORIC HEADLINES
WORLD WAR I AND AFTER
WORLD WAR II
AFTER WORLD WAR II
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
Airplane
HOW AN AIRPLANE FLIES
SUPERSONIC FLIGHT
AIRPLANE STRUCTURE
Wings
Tail Assembly
Landing Gear
Control Components
Instruments
PROPULSION
TYPES OF AIRPLANES
Land Planes
Carrier-Based Aircraft
Seaplanes
Amphibians
Vertical Takeoff and Landing Airplanes
Short Takeoff and Landing Airplanes
Space Shuttle
CLASSES OF AIRPLANES
Commercial Airplanes
Military Airplanes
General-Aviation Aircraft
HISTORY
The First Airplane Flight
Early Military and Public Interest
Planes of World War I
Development of Commercial Aviation
Aircraft Developments of World War II
The Jumbo Jet Era

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS




Aviation Security | September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks in the United States | Air Travel

Aviation security became a major issue following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States in which hijackers crashed two commercial jetliners into the World Trade Center in New York City and another into the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, outside Washington, D.C. In November 2001 the United States Congress enacted the Aviation and Transportation Security Act in response to the attacks, which exposed a number of weaknesses in airport and airline security. The new law expanded the number of baggage screeners, imposed standards for their training, and made them federal employees for an interim period of time. Beginning in January 2002 it required that all passenger luggage, including checked luggage, be examined. It also mandated that by the end of 2002 all luggage must be put through special explosives-detecting devices. The law increased the number of armed federal air marshals flying on domestic flights and required international airlines to turn over advance copies of their passenger lists to U.S. Customs officials for background checks to screen out suspected terrorists. (Aviation Security, September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks in the United States, Air Travel Security)

Aboard commercial airplanes, the law required that cockpits be fortified to prevent intruders from commandeering the airplanes, as happened during the September 11 attacks. A number of hijackers, who were all foreign nationals, had attended flight training schools in Florida. The new law mandated that flight instructors report the names of any foreign nationals seeking training on aircraft weighing more than 5,600 kg (12,500 lb). Flight instructors were required to report the names to the U.S. attorney generalís office for screening, and the attorney generalís office was also required to review the background of any foreign national seeking to sell, lease, or charter a plane weighing more than 5,600 kg. (Aviation Security, September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks in the United States, Air Travel Security)



Aviation Security | September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks in the United States | Air Travel Security