Cold-blooded and Warm-blooded Animals


On land, some invertebrates manage to overcome the problem of cold by using muscles to warm themselves. For example, many large moths and bumblebees use a special form of shivering to raise their body temperature to 35°C (95°F) before they take off, which allows them to fly in cool weather.

Bees also maintain warm conditions in their nests, which speeds up the development of their young. But in invertebrates as a whole, temperature regulation is very unusual. In vertebrates, on the other hand, it has developed to a high degree.


Funny animal: Penguins always return to their ancestral nesting sites to lay their eggs and rear their young. The emperor penguin, the largest of the penguins, lays its single egg during the coldest time of the Antarctic year, when temperatures drop as low as -62 degrees C (-80 degrees F). The egg is incubated on top of the parent’s feet, protected by abdominal folds of skin. Young chicks remain under these abdominal folds until they are able to regulate their own body temperature. It is friends animal.

Vertebrates are customarily divided into cold-blooded and warm-blooded animals, but these labels are not very precise. Biologists normally use the terms ectoderm and endoderm to describe temperature regulation more accurately. An ectoderm is an animal whose temperature is dictated by its surroundings, while an endoderm is one that keeps its body at a constant warm temperature by generating internal heat.

Reptiles, amphibians, and fish are ectoderms. Although they do not maintain a constant warm temperature, some of these animals do manage to raise their body temperature far above that of their surroundings. They do this by behavioral means, such as basking in direct sunshine when the surrounding air is cool. Mammals and birds are endoderms. These animals generate heat through their metabolic processes, and they retain it by having insulating layers of fat, fur, or feathers. Because their bodies are always warm, they can remain active in some of the coldest conditions on earth.

Next

auuuu.com©2007.
Animals Home




ANIMALS:


INTRODUCTION
TYPES OF ANIMALS
Vertebrates and Invertebrates
Cold-blooded and Warm-blooded Animals
ANIMAL HABITATS
Aquatic Habitats
Land Habitats
FEEDING
Herbivores and Carnivores
Other Feeding Strategies
BREATHING
MOVEMENT
Jointed Limbs
Patterns of Movement
REPRODUCTION
Forms of Reproduction
Reproductive Strategies
Mating Systems
Parental Care
STRATEGIES FOR SURVIVAL
Physical Adaptations
Behavioral Adaptations
ORIGINS OF ANIMALS
Moving onto Land
Speciation and Extinction
ANIMALS IN THE BALANCE OF NATURE
Animals and People



DOGS:


INTRODUCTION
Dog Family
Dog Racing
Dog Shows and Trials
Dogsledding
Herding Dogs
Hounds
Nonsporting Dogs
Sporting Dogs
Terriers
Toy Breeds
Working Dogs


Australian Cattle Dog
Australian Shepherd
Bearded Collie
Belgian Malinois
Belgian Sheepdog
Belgian Tervuren
Bernese Mountain Dog
Border Collie
Bouvier des Flandres
Briard
Collie
German Shepherd Dog
Great Pyrenees
Kelpie
Kerry Blue Terrier
Kuvasz
Old English Sheepdog
Puli
Rottweiler
Shetland Sheepdog
Welsh Corgi



WOLVES:


INTRODUCTION
Coyote
Gray Wolf
Red Wolf



FOXES:


INTRODUCTION
THE RED FOX
OTHER FOXES
Fennec, African fox
Fox Hunting
Red Fox

Animals Home