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INTRODUCTION

TYPES OF BICYCLES
Touring Bicycles
Mountain Bikes
Hybrid or Cross Bikes
Utility Bicycles
Racing Bicycles
Specialty Bicycles

COMPONENTS OF THE BICYCLE
Frame
Wheels and Tires
Saddle
Brakes
Handlebars
Pedals
Drive Train
Gears
Suspension System

SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES
Helmets
Reflectors and Lights
Rearview Mirrors
Padded Shorts and Gloves
Racks and Panniers
Child Seats and Trailers

HISTORY OF THE MODERN BICYCLE
Early Attempts
The Safety Bicycle
The Decline of Cycling
The Bicycle Boom



BIKING:


INTRODUCTION
BICYCLE RACING
RACING EQUIPMENT
RACING ADMINISTRATION
RECREATIONAL CYCLING




Tour de France


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RECREATIONAL CYCLING




These two cyclists ride their mountain bikes down a dirt trail. An American innovation in a sport historically dominated by Europeans, mountain biking originated in California in the early 1980s. Built to withstand the rigors of off-road trails in both recreational and competitive off-road cycling, mountain bikes utilize reinforced tubing, advanced suspension systems, and wide, knobby tires. Cyclists ride mountain bikes over terrain that is mostly inaccessible to the more fragile traditional road bikes.

There are an estimated 33 million adult cyclists in the United States, and the popularity of the sport at the recreational level continues to grow. This popularity has resulted from the country's ongoing interest in physical fitness, the international success of such American cyclists as Greg LeMond (winner of the Tour de France in 1986, 1989, and 1990), and the search for more efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly modes of transportation. Road riding and touring were especially popular in the United States during the 1970s and the mid- to late 1980s, but mountain biking superseded them in popularity during the 1990s.




Since bikes do not have turn signals, bicyclists need to use hand signals to indicate their intentions to drivers or riders behind them.

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