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INTRODUCTION

TYPES OF BICYCLES
Touring Bicycles
Mountain Bikes
Hybrid or Cross Bikes
Utility Bicycles
Racing Bicycles
Specialty Bicycles

COMPONENTS OF THE BICYCLE
Frame
Wheels and Tires
Saddle
Brakes
Handlebars
Pedals
Drive Train
Gears
Suspension System

SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES
Helmets
Reflectors and Lights
Rearview Mirrors
Padded Shorts and Gloves
Racks and Panniers
Child Seats and Trailers

HISTORY OF THE MODERN BICYCLE
Early Attempts
The Safety Bicycle
The Decline of Cycling
The Bicycle Boom



BIKING:


INTRODUCTION
BICYCLE RACING
RACING EQUIPMENT
RACING ADMINISTRATION
RECREATIONAL CYCLING




Tour de France


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Saddle


The bicycle saddle, or seat, is made of leather, vinyl, plastic, or gel-filled material (for extra padding) and is wrapped around a metal frame bolted to the seat post. In general, a very wide saddle is less desirable than a narrower one, because it is heavier and may interfere with the movement of the thighs while pedaling. The narrowest saddles are usually preferred by male riders. Some manufacturers have designed saddles to accommodate the wider pelvic structure of female cyclists.

Saddles have also been designed with cutouts in the hard base material and grooves down the center to relieve pressure on pelvic nerves and the pelvic “sit bones.” To fit a cyclist, the height of the saddle can be adjusted by 15 cm (6 in) or more by raising or lowering the seat post in the bicycle frame’s seat tube. For further accommodation of fit, the saddle also may be slid a few centimeters forward or back on two parallel rails welded to its frame. A joint where the seat post bolts onto the saddle allows the saddle’s nose to be slightly tilted up or down.

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