www.auuuu.com Home



PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION:
TYPES OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Buses
Paratransit
Streetcars
Light-Rail Transit
Heavy-Rail Transit
Commuter Rail Transit
Automated Guided Transit
Ferries
DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN THE UNITED STATES
HISTORY

AUTOMOBILE:
POWER SYSTEM
Engine
Engine Types
Fuel Supply
Exhaust System
Cooling and Heating System
DRIVETRAIN
Transmission
Front- and Rear-Wheel Drive
SUPPORT SYSTEMS
Suspension System
Wheels and Tires
CONTROL SYSTEMS
Steering
Brakes
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Ignition System
SAFETY FEATURES
HISTORY
Automobiles Through the Years
Internal-Combustion Engine
Early Electric Cars
AUTOMOBILES IN THE 20TH CENTURY
NEW TECHNOLOGIES

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY:
ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE
Domestic Impact
Foreign Trade
HOW CARS ARE BUILT
Research, Design, and Development
Manufacturing and Assembly
Sales and Service
Customer Feedback
HISTORY OF THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY
Early Automobile Concepts
Henry Ford and Mass Production
Other Automakers
The Great Depression of the 1930s
Labor Unions and Strikes
Wartime Production
Postwar Production
Automobile Safety
Foreign Imports and the Energy Crisis
The 1980s and 1990s
FUTURE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY TRENDS
Computerization
Alternative Fuel Research
Materials and Safety


www.auuuu.com Home
Ferries


A British Sealink ferry carries both walk-on passengers and cars. Ferries are usually used for coastal or short-distance transportation.

Ferries are often used in cities with rivers, lakes, or other bodies of water that pose obstacles to transportation. Ferry technology includes ferryboats and, to a lesser extent, hovercraft and hydrofoils. Ferryboats are used to carry people, and often motor vehicles, over short distances. Sizes vary from small boats that can hold a few passengers to large vessels that can carry as many as 200 automobiles and 2,500 passengers. A hovercraft rides on a cushion of air created by air pressure underneath a specially designed skirt (see Air-Cushion Vehicle). Large hovercraft are popular for crossing the English Channel between France and England. Hydrofoils are large boats with submerged fins or foils. As the speed of a hydrofoil increases, its hull rises out of the water and the boat rides on the foils. Because less of the vessel is in the water, resulting in less resistance to the motion of the hydrofoil, it can reach much higher speeds than a regular boat.

Next


auuuu.com2007.




TRUCK:
LIGHT TRUCKS
MEDIUM TRUCKS
HEAVY TRUCKS
TRAILERS
TRUCKING OPERATIONS AND REGULATIONS
HISTORY

ROAD:
TYPES OF ROADS
Highways
Urban Streets
Rural Roads
ROADWAY ENGINEERING
Roadbed
Base Course
Wearing Course
Bituminous Pavement
Concrete Pavement
ROAD PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION
HISTORY OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION