www.auuuu.com Home



PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION:
TYPES OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Buses
Paratransit
Streetcars
Light-Rail Transit
Heavy-Rail Transit
Commuter Rail Transit
Automated Guided Transit
Ferries
DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN THE UNITED STATES
HISTORY

AUTOMOBILE:
POWER SYSTEM
Engine
Engine Types
Fuel Supply
Exhaust System
Cooling and Heating System
DRIVETRAIN
Transmission
Front- and Rear-Wheel Drive
SUPPORT SYSTEMS
Suspension System
Wheels and Tires
CONTROL SYSTEMS
Steering
Brakes
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Ignition System
SAFETY FEATURES
HISTORY
Automobiles Through the Years
Internal-Combustion Engine
Early Electric Cars
AUTOMOBILES IN THE 20TH CENTURY
NEW TECHNOLOGIES

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY:
ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE
Domestic Impact
Foreign Trade
HOW CARS ARE BUILT
Research, Design, and Development
Manufacturing and Assembly
Sales and Service
Customer Feedback
HISTORY OF THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY
Early Automobile Concepts
Henry Ford and Mass Production
Other Automakers
The Great Depression of the 1930s
Labor Unions and Strikes
Wartime Production
Postwar Production
Automobile Safety
Foreign Imports and the Energy Crisis
The 1980s and 1990s
FUTURE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY TRENDS
Computerization
Alternative Fuel Research
Materials and Safety


www.auuuu.com Home
TYPES OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

Public transportation systems differ in the type of right-of-way each system has and the technology each system uses. These factors help determine the speed of a system, where it is able to operate, and how often vehicles in the system travel along various routes.

Right-of-way refers to the physical path that a transportation system follows. If a system has a fully controlled right-of-way, then the system does not have to yield to other transportation systems and can move more rapidly. Subways have a fully controlled right-of-way, because they run on rails dedicated solely to subway use. Therefore, subways can operate safely at high speeds. Buses must share the right-of-way with other motor vehicles on the road, and, consequently, buses move more slowly. Some rail systems, such as light rail, may have a semiexclusive right-of-way. They may share the right-of-way with motor-vehicle traffic for part of the journey, then shift to a fully controlled right-of-way, such as an elevated rail track or a tunnel, for the remainder of the trip. A fully controlled right-of-way provides the best performance of a transportation system but also costs the most money to construct. Sharing the right-of-way with other systems is cheaper, but service can suffer because of traffic or other problems.

The mechanical features of the vehicle and the riding surface of a public transportation system constitute the technology of the system. Technologies differ in cost, flexibility, and speed of travel. For instance, buses generally use diesel fuel and travel on the same streets as cars and trucks do. Rail systems may use electric motors or diesel locomotives for propulsion but are limited to traveling on steel tracks or rails. Bus technology is more flexible than rail systems, and bus routes can be easily changed to accommodate changing ridership. Rail technology is generally faster than motor-vehicle technology but is also more expensive to purchase and operate.

The most common types of public transportation are bus, paratransit, streetcar, light rail, heavy rail, commuter rail, automated guided transit, and ferry.

Next


auuuu.com2007.




TRUCK:
LIGHT TRUCKS
MEDIUM TRUCKS
HEAVY TRUCKS
TRAILERS
TRUCKING OPERATIONS AND REGULATIONS
HISTORY

ROAD:
TYPES OF ROADS
Highways
Urban Streets
Rural Roads
ROADWAY ENGINEERING
Roadbed
Base Course
Wearing Course
Bituminous Pavement
Concrete Pavement
ROAD PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION
HISTORY OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION