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PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION:
TYPES OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Buses
Paratransit
Streetcars
Light-Rail Transit
Heavy-Rail Transit
Commuter Rail Transit
Automated Guided Transit
Ferries
DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN THE UNITED STATES
HISTORY

AUTOMOBILE:
POWER SYSTEM
Engine
Engine Types
Fuel Supply
Exhaust System
Cooling and Heating System
DRIVETRAIN
Transmission
Front- and Rear-Wheel Drive
SUPPORT SYSTEMS
Suspension System
Wheels and Tires
CONTROL SYSTEMS
Steering
Brakes
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Ignition System
SAFETY FEATURES
HISTORY
Automobiles Through the Years
Internal-Combustion Engine
Early Electric Cars
AUTOMOBILES IN THE 20TH CENTURY
NEW TECHNOLOGIES

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY:
ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE
Domestic Impact
Foreign Trade
HOW CARS ARE BUILT
Research, Design, and Development
Manufacturing and Assembly
Sales and Service
Customer Feedback
HISTORY OF THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY
Early Automobile Concepts
Henry Ford and Mass Production
Other Automakers
The Great Depression of the 1930s
Labor Unions and Strikes
Wartime Production
Postwar Production
Automobile Safety
Foreign Imports and the Energy Crisis
The 1980s and 1990s
FUTURE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY TRENDS
Computerization
Alternative Fuel Research
Materials and Safety


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Heavy-Rail Transit


The Mexico City subway, or metro, is one of the most extensive and modern subway systems in North America. The metro features several lines running below Mexico City and serving outlying suburban communities. Most of the Mexico City subway cars run on rubber rather than metal wheels.

Heavy-rail systems are also commonly referred to as rail rapid transit. Subways (often called metros outside of the United States) are common examples, although rail rapid-transit systems may also operate above ground, as parts of the New York City and Chicago, Illinois, subway systems do. Heavy-rail systems typically consist of large four-axle rail vehicles operating in trains of two to ten cars. Rail rapid-transit systems operate on tracks reserved solely for the rail cars, and so the trains are able to travel at high speeds. Some rail rapid-transit systems, such as BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) in the San Francisco Bay area, are highly automated. Power for rail rapid-transit vehicles is usually supplied by an electrified third rail mounted alongside the train tracks. Some heavy-rail systems use rubber tires rather than steel wheels. These tires produce a quieter ride but create more friction, which reduces efficiency. A monorail is a special type of heavy-rail system that uses a single rail to support and guide the vehicles. A monorail that was built for the 1962 World’s Fair in Seattle, Washington, connects the downtown to the nearby fairgrounds and is still in use. Monorails have also been built for circular routes around airports or at amusement parks, such as Walt Disney World, but they have not been widely used for urban transportation.

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TRUCK:
LIGHT TRUCKS
MEDIUM TRUCKS
HEAVY TRUCKS
TRAILERS
TRUCKING OPERATIONS AND REGULATIONS
HISTORY

ROAD:
TYPES OF ROADS
Highways
Urban Streets
Rural Roads
ROADWAY ENGINEERING
Roadbed
Base Course
Wearing Course
Bituminous Pavement
Concrete Pavement
ROAD PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION
HISTORY OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION