Road - INTRODUCTION
TYPES OF ROADS
Highways
Urban Streets
Rural Roads
ROADWAY ENGINEERING
Roadbed
Base Course
Wearing Course
Bituminous Pavement
Concrete Pavement
ROAD PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION
HISTORY OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION


AUTOMOBILE
AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
TRUCK


Urban Streets




Urban Streets | City Streets | Local Roads | Bicycle Traffic | Private Motor Vehicles


Urban Streets

City streets are generally paved with asphalt or concrete and are bordered on either side by raised curbs. Buildings, sidewalks, and residences border city streets. This busy multilane street passes through downtown Durban, South Africa. (Urban Streets, City Streets, Local Roads, Bicycle Traffic, Private Motor Vehicles)

Urban streets, which cover cities, towns, and most suburbs, allow vehicles to access properties such as homes and businesses. Urban streets are used by private motor vehicles, public transportation, bicycle traffic, and pedestrians. Urban streets also accommodate underground public-utility facilities, such as electrical wiring, water and sewage pipes, and telecommunications lines. In addition, these streets must often be built around existing buildings and other barriers, such as parks and rivers. Rather than shoulders, urban streets usually have raised edges called curbs, which provide a barrier between the street and the adjoining property or sidewalk. (Urban Streets, City Streets, Local Roads, Bicycle Traffic, Private Motor Vehicles)

Urban streets are generally two-way paved roads that intersect each other frequently, allowing a high degree of access but at slow speeds. Traffic lights and signs help regulate the movement of vehicles along these streets and control the access to some streets. Urban streets are usually classified as one of three types: local, collector, and arterial. These designations are based on the amount of traffic each type is designed to carry. (Urban Streets, City Streets, Local Roads, Bicycle Traffic, Private Motor Vehicles)

Most urban streets are residential, or local, streets that allow vehicles to access public and private property. These streets make up 70 percent of total urban-road mileage but handle only 14 percent of all urban traffic. Collector streets convey traffic from residential streets to larger roads called arterials. Arterials are used to get quickly from one point to another and can accommodate high volumes of traffic. In large cities, arterials are often similar to highways in construction even though they are located within city limits. Although arterials account for only 17 percent of the urban-road mileage, they account for most of the traffic in cities. (Urban Streets, City Streets, Local Roads, Bicycle Traffic, Private Motor Vehicles)

Urban Streets | City Streets | Local Roads | Bicycle Traffic | Private Motor Vehicles