Alzheimer's - INTRODUCTION

SYMPTOMS

BRAIN ABNORMALITIES

CAUSES

DIAGNOSIS

TREATMENT

CARING FOR THE ALZHEIMER’S PATIENT




Down Syndrome



Health&Medicine Home


DIAGNOSIS




DIAGNOSIS - Alzheimer’s Disease | Diagnose probable Alzheimer’s disease in living patients

Alzheimer’s disease is only positively diagnosed by examining brain tissue under a microscope to see the hallmark plaques and tangles, and this is only possible after a patient dies. As a result, physicians rely on a series of other techniques to diagnose probable Alzheimer’s disease in living patients. Diagnosis begins by ruling out other problems that cause memory loss, such as stroke, depression, alcoholism, and the use of certain prescription drugs. The patient undergoes a thorough examination, including specialized brain scans, to eliminate other disorders. The patient may be given a detailed evaluation called a neuropsychological examination, which is designed to evaluate a patient’s ability to perform specific mental tasks. This helps the physician determine whether the patient is showing the characteristic symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease—progressively worsening memory problems, language difficulties, and trouble with spatial direction and time. The physician also asks about the patient’s family medical history to learn about any past serious illnesses, which may give a hint about the patient’s current symptoms. (Diagnose probable Alzheimer’s disease in living patients)

DIAGNOSIS - Alzheimer’s Disease | Diagnose probable Alzheimer’s disease in living patients