HEALTH and MEDICAL EDUCATION

HEALTH and MEDICAL EDUCATION

Environmental and Occupational Chemicals

Air pollution, water pollution, and pollutants in the soil account for about 2 percent of all cancer deaths in the country, particularly due to lung and bladder cancer. Lung cancer rates are generally higher in cities, where increased industry and automobile traffic produce air pollution.

Environmental and Occupational Chemicals A thick layer of fumes hovers over the city of Cubatao in Sao Paulo state, Brazil. Pollution in the air, water, and soil accounts for about 2 percent of all American cancer deaths, and may be responsible for a higher percentage of cancer deaths in countries with less stringent pollution control laws. Lung cancer rates tend to be higher in urban and industrial centers, where air pollution is a constant problem. Some people encounter carcinogenic chemicals in their working environment. Occupational carcinogens account for about 5 percent of all U.S. cancer deaths and include such industrial chemicals as benzene, asbestos, vinyl chloride, aniline dyes, arsenic, and certain petroleum products.

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