THEODORE ROOSEVELT QUOTES
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Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 January 6, 1919), also known as T.R., and to the public (but never to friends and intimates) as Teddy, was the twenty-sixth President of the United States. A leader of the Republican Party and of the Progressive Party, he was a Governor of New York and a professional historian, naturalist, explorer, hunter, author, and soldier. It behooves every man to remember that the work of the critic is of altogether secondary importance, and that in the end, progress is accomplished by the man who does things.
Quotes:
Patriotism means to stand by the country. It does not mean to stand by the president.

When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.'

Justice consists not in being neutral between right and wrong, but in finding out the right and upholding it, wherever found, against the wrong.

The death-knell of the republic had rung as soon as the active power became lodged in the hands of those who sought, not to do justice to all citizens, rich and poor alike, but to stand for one special class and for its interests as opposed to the interests of others.
Labor Day speech at Syracuse, NY, Sept 7, 1903 ("Theodore Rex" - Edmund Morris)

There is a homely old adage which runs: "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far." If the American nation will speak softly, and yet build and keep at a pitch of the highest training a thoroughly efficient navy, the Monroe Doctrine will go far.
Speech in Chicago, 3 Apr. 1903

A vote is like a rifle: its usefulness depends upon the character of the user.

Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.

Don't hit at all if it is honorably possible to avoid hitting; but never hit soft!

When you play, play hard; when you work, don't play at all.

Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell 'em, 'Certainly I can!' Then get busy and find out how to do it.

No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expediency.
'The Strenuous Life,' 1900

Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.

Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.
Speech in New York, September 7, 1903


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