Boats
Boats and Boatbuilding INTRODUCTION
BASICS OF BOAT DESIGN
Buoyancy and Weight
Trim and Stability
Structure
Watertightness

SKIN AND BARK BOATS

WOODEN BOATS
Lapstrake Construction
Carvel Construction
Plywood Construction

CANVAS-COVERED BOATS
ALUMINUM BOATS
FERROCEMENT BOATS
FIBERGLASS BOATS
MEASURING AND MODELING
The Half-Model
Lift Models and Lofting

BOAT PROPULSION
Inboard Motors
Outboard Motors
Water-Jet Drive
Surface-Piercing Propeller

Motor-Boat Racing
Rowing
Yachting

Ships
THE EARLIEST SHIPS
Earliest Sailing Vessels
Galleys
Biremes
Triremes
Roman Galleys
Dromons
Lateen-Rigged Ships
Junks
Viking Ships
Cog
Carrack
Caravel
Galleon
East Indiamen
Ships of the Line
Frigates, Sloops, and Brigs
Clippers
Last Days of Sail
FUEL-POWERED SHIPS
Paddlewheel Steamships
Innovative Ships of the Late 19th Century
The Screw Propeller
Iron and Steel Hulls
Double- and Triple-Expansion Steam Engines
Steam Turbines
Diesel Engines
The Great Ocean Liners
Cruise Ships
Cargo Ships
Container Ships
Roll-On-Roll-Off and LASH Vessels
Tankers
Crude Carriers
Product Tankers
Other Specialized Tankers
Tanker Safety
Fishing Vessels
Trawlers
Seiners
Long Liners
Research Vessels
Hovercraft
The First Nuclear-Powered Vessels
Naval Vessels
Aircraft Carriers
Battleships
Cruisers
Destroyers
Frigates
Mine Craft
NEW TRENDS IN SHIP DESIGN
SUBMARINES
Submersible Craft
Torpedo (weapon)
shiptravel.auuuu.com Index

Carvel Construction


Constructing a Wooden Whaler
Constructing a Wooden Whaler
Wooden ships like this 8-m (26-ft) whaler are built in stages. Because the timber must be steamed into the properly curved shapes, a fairly complex skeleton and bracing system is needed. Here, workers place horizontal planks called strakes to form the smooth curve of the hull on the starboard side of the ship.

The smooth-planked, or carvel-built, boat was developed in the Mediterranean region and was probably a natural evolution of the craft constructed of short planks bolted edge to edge used by the ancient Egyptians. Plank and frame construction was probably fully developed before ancient Greece rose to maritime prominence. As in lapstrake construction, the use of pegs probably preceded the use of metal fastenings between plank and framing.

A framing system made of almost equally spaced transverse frames fastened to a continuous keel and strengthened by a pair of gunwales running from bow to stern was a logical step in the development of smooth-planked boats. The problem of seam leakage was solved by using wood tar and caulking material, as in earlier lapstrake craft.

In so-called smooth-lap construction, developed in the 19th century, plank edges are rabbeted, or shaped, so that they lap and still remain smooth at the seams; the rabbeted laps are nailed in the usual lapstrake manner. See Woodworking: Carpentry.

In the early 20th century the use of lapstrake construction decreased, while carvel construction became more popular. The shift was caused largely by the need for extreme structural strength necessitated by the use of motors in small boats. Carvel construction also better met the demand for fast sailing craft used for racing.
Boats
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