Boats
Boats and Boatbuilding INTRODUCTION
BASICS OF BOAT DESIGN
Buoyancy and Weight
Trim and Stability
Structure
Watertightness

SKIN AND BARK BOATS

WOODEN BOATS
Lapstrake Construction
Carvel Construction
Plywood Construction

CANVAS-COVERED BOATS
ALUMINUM BOATS
FERROCEMENT BOATS
FIBERGLASS BOATS
MEASURING AND MODELING
The Half-Model
Lift Models and Lofting

BOAT PROPULSION
Inboard Motors
Outboard Motors
Water-Jet Drive
Surface-Piercing Propeller

Motor-Boat Racing
Rowing
Yachting

Ships
THE EARLIEST SHIPS
Earliest Sailing Vessels
Galleys
Biremes
Triremes
Roman Galleys
Dromons
Lateen-Rigged Ships
Junks
Viking Ships
Cog
Carrack
Caravel
Galleon
East Indiamen
Ships of the Line
Frigates, Sloops, and Brigs
Clippers
Last Days of Sail
FUEL-POWERED SHIPS
Paddlewheel Steamships
Innovative Ships of the Late 19th Century
The Screw Propeller
Iron and Steel Hulls
Double- and Triple-Expansion Steam Engines
Steam Turbines
Diesel Engines
The Great Ocean Liners
Cruise Ships
Cargo Ships
Container Ships
Roll-On-Roll-Off and LASH Vessels
Tankers
Crude Carriers
Product Tankers
Other Specialized Tankers
Tanker Safety
Fishing Vessels
Trawlers
Seiners
Long Liners
Research Vessels
Hovercraft
The First Nuclear-Powered Vessels
Naval Vessels
Aircraft Carriers
Battleships
Cruisers
Destroyers
Frigates
Mine Craft
NEW TRENDS IN SHIP DESIGN
SUBMARINES
Submersible Craft
Torpedo (weapon)
shiptravel.auuuu.com Index

Boats: Outboard Motors


The outboard motor is probably the most common means of propulsion for boats. This machine is nearly always a two-stroke spark-ignition (gasoline) engine, mounted vertically at the stern of a boat in order to drive a shaft that in turn drives a conventional screw propeller through right-angle gears. It has the great virtue of being mounted external to the hull, thus being easily adaptable to almost any boat. Outboard motors operate on a mixture of gasoline and marine oil.

The development of the outboard motor was rather slow in the early years of the 20th century. After World War I (1914-1918), the popularity of the outboard motor grew steadily, and as a result its power gradually was increased, and it was made more reliable. The popularity of the outboard motor increased tremendously after World War II (1939-1945), and small cruisers, runabouts, utility boats, and various classes of racers became available. By the late 1970s, powerful outboard motors, ranging up to 200 horsepower rating, were available, as was special equipment for handling such engines at the water's edge. The use of two outboard motors on cruisers and runabouts was common.

Because of the great power available and because the low transom required by this type of motor creates the danger of the boat being swamped, the safety of the outboard motorboat has become a matter of public and governmental concern. The popularity of this type of boat also has produced crowded waters at lake and seaside resorts. In many areas measures have been adopted to prevent accidents caused by excessive speed, careless or reckless operation, and poor boat design

Outboard Motors
Outboard Motors
Outboard motors, like the ones mounted on these skiffs, are the most common means of propulsion for boats. Because it is mounted external to the hull, the motor is adaptable to almost any boat.
Boats
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