SUBMARINES & SUBMERSIBLE CRAFT
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Modern Attack submarines

The attack submarine is a fast submarine that is primarily designed to hunt other submarines or surface warships. Attack submarines are powered either by a diesel-electric propulsion system or a nuclear reactor. An American Los Angeles class attack submarine is 109.7 m (360 ft) long, with a crew of 141. Apart from attacking other ships, they can also strike land targets with cruise missiles; conduct secret scouting missions; land small teams of commandos; and lay mines (see Mine, warfare). The attack submarine is designed for stealth and speed, and normally operates on its own rather than as part of a fleet. Since the enemy can detect direct communications, an attack submarine usually limits the number of direct transmissions it broadcasts. Like most submarines, it receives orders by way of encoded communications from satellites.

Attack Submarine, modern name for a naval vessel designed to operate principally underwater and to attack and destroy other submarines and surface ships using torpedoes and missiles. The ability of the attack submarine to operate independently—in total concealment and stealth—sets it apart from surface warships, which historically have operated in fleets for mutual protection. Early submarines were considered to be coastal patrol craft because of their limited range, cruising endurance, and weapon capacity. But as technology enabled them to range out into the deep ocean, submarines began to play key roles in attacking enemy warships and commercial supply ships.

USS NAUTILUS

USS NAUTILUS was the Navy's first nuclear-powered vessel and the fourth ship in the Navy to bear the name. She was also the world's first ship to reach the geographic North Pole. Both decommissioned and stricken from the Navy list on March 3, 1980, the NAUTILUS became a museum on May 20, 1982 and is now located at the Historic NAUTILUS & Submarine Force Museum at New London, Conn.
USS NAUTILUS


General Characteristics:

Awarded: August 2, 1951
Keel laid: June 14, 1952
Launched: January 21, 1954
Commissioned: September 30, 1954
Decommissioned: March 3, 1980
Builder: Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation, Groton, CT.
Propulsion system: one nuclear reactor
Propellers: two
Length: 324 feet (98.75 meters)
Beam: 27.8 feet (8.47 meters)
Draft: 22 feet (6.7 meters)
Displacement: Surfaced: approx. 3,530 tons Submerged: approx. 4,090 tons
Speed: Surfaced: approx. 22 knots Submerged: approx. +20 knots
Armament: six 533 mm torpedo tubes
Crew: 13 Officers, 92 Enlisted


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